How To Use Your Back Story To Increase Success in Architecture

NOTE: We're letting you in on this video, created as a follow-up for Summit attendees, since it's a valuable message that can increase success in architecture.

In this video, Richard shares tips about how a back story can increase success in architecture (also known as moving up the power pyramid).

When it comes to the architecture (or any) field, it's important to fully develop your persona and reputation. Show that you're the best at what you do. Who makes the most money while working on the most fulfilling projects, a generalist or an expert?

How Does A Back Story Increase Success In Architecture?

The Power of Celebrity Changes Everything …

If you visit LA you're bound to run into Angelina Jolie, Tom Cruise or Arnold, right?

Never happens for me!

Except for this past week when I was with my AMI partner, Richard Petrie.

Richard Petrie has a magical “celebrity attracting” mojo.

He visits the U.S. a few times a year from his homeland of New Zealand.

So far on his trips, he's run into Floyd Mayweather two times (one of the greatest boxers of all time) and Lance Armstrong of Tour de France fame in Austin.

So I shouldn't have been surprised when I walked out of my room at the Hilton LAX during our recent Architect Business Development Summit and stood face-to-face with Terry Bradshaw, famous television sports anchor and 4-time Super Bowl winner.

Of course, we struck up a conversation like old time friends, took pictures together, and went for a ride in his limousine. All this ended in a roof-top pool party.

NOT. Actually we stood tongue-tied like a bunch of love-struck school boys (except for Richard who asked and confirmed it was really him).

In any case, I was left thinking of the power of celebrity…

And how it makes grown adults do silly things.

If you've ever heard Richard describe his “power pyramid” concept you know what I mean. Learn more about how it relates to what you do as an architect.

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3comments
James Carrick - July 29, 2016

Made me think why I changed from the usual go with the flow architecture to concentrate on healthcare.
I suddenly woke up one day and realised the only thing I was doing was helping rich people get richer and not actually making anything that helped the Joe Bloggs out there.
So I decided from then on to take a contract role with an NHS Estates team and it became my university of life where I got to see things that no healthcare architect would ever see.
It opened my eyes up to the real reasons why we build things…….to make a difference and to be honest I know at some time I will need that very facility that someone designed.
Thanks for bringing purpose back

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Eric Bobrow - July 27, 2016

Thanks Edward for sharing your charming back story!

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Edward J Shannon - July 27, 2016

Love the back story! I’m an architect that actually likes doing additions! My dad built two additions on the house I grew up in (unusual for the time). The second addition was a bedroom suite for my brother and me. I was 11 and was on site everyday after school. When I played with lego’s I would always build a small house and add on – sometimes it was a total overhaul. But, it fascinated me. Thanks Richard! I am going to use this story on my website in regard to “Do you do additions?”

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